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October 11, 2012 Front Page
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This is not a scientific poll.

October 11 Poll Results
Big Bird

Will Big Bird and his co-stars endure if Mitt Romney is elected President of the United States?

62% Yes, they’ll be fine – most of PBS’ funding is not from the government. (37)
13% No, I don’t think they will. (8)
25% I’m tired of hearing about this! (15)

Story Headlines for October 11, 2012
(Not all articles are listed. Read front page news by clicking on the link in the lower left column.)
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  • A Pearl of a Girl, Marguerite McLaughlin
    The little township of Matchwood, in the upper peninsula of Michigan, was Marguerite Pearl Miller’s first home. The burg was named after the Diamond Match Company which owned most of the pine timber there, and many logging camps flourished in the early days. The town’s mill burned down before Marguerite was born, forcing many families to move away. Fortunately, Marguerite’s father Harvey Miller was an “all around business man” as she puts it. He had done everything from farming to bringing cars up from Detroit to sell to support his family. Harvey was a Republican Township Supervisor, married to Marguerite’s Democratic mother, Luella Livingston. They seemed to make it work, however, and raised four children – two girls and two boys. Bruce McLaughlin came home on a short leave from the Army; he had been serving in Germany in the war years. Marguerite, still a senior in high school, had seen Bruce around of course – a former football and basketball player, who also ran track in high school, wouldn’t go unnoticed. But she didn’t know him until they met at the weekly dance held in the town’s pavilion alongside Lake Gogebic. That was the beginning of Bruce’s lifelong relationship with the young girl from Matchwood. To read the rest of this article, please subscribe. If you already subscribe, log in and read pages 6-8A.

  • Orofino man in dirt bike wreck
    Greg Grimshaw, 52, of Orofino was involved in a dirt bike wreck Sept. 29 at Fords Creek Canyon off of Green Road, near Weippe, according to Clearwater County Sheriff’s Office (CCSO). The wreck occurred at 11:25 a.m., while Grimshaw was riding dirt bikes with some friends. Grimshaw and his bike were thrown over the edge of a 10-foot embankment, landing on large rocks. To read the rest of this article, please subscribe. If you already subscribe, log in and read page 2B.

  • Orofino man dies in wreck
    A tractor-trailer crash on the Oregon coast, near Seal Rock, claimed the life of Drew Elliot, 28, of Orofino on Oct. 4. He was driving south on U.S. Highway 101, when his 2008 Kenworth tractor-trailer traveled off the roadway through a ditch and struck an embankment. The vehicle then fell onto its left side. Elliot was pronounced dead at the scene, according to the state police, and was wearing a seatbelt.
    To read the rest of this article, please subscribe. If you already subscribe, log in and read page 9B.

  • Circle of Hope celebration at Pierce Post Office
    Since its beginning July 29, 1998 through Sept. 2011, the breast cancer research semi-postal stamp has generated over $75 million for breast cancer research from the sale of stamps. On Oct. 15, Pierce Postmaster Lori McMillen invites everyone to take an active role in restoring hope in our hearts, homes, communities, and ultimately the nation. The Pierce post office will be serving cookies and punch from 10 a.m. until 12 noon. By purchasing the breast cancer stamps, donating $2.20 for research, you will receive a breast cancer item of your choice.
    To read the rest of this article, please subscribe. If you already subscribe, log in and read page 5A.

  • Maniacs best Bengals
    In their first-ever (??) football game played against a JV team, the Orofino Maniacs' experience and maturity proved to be over-powering. The Maniacs put together a strong defensive effort and an offensive blend of running and passing that was more than the Lewiston Bengals JV could bomb their way out of. Orofino jumped out to a 16 – 0 first quarter lead and then, despite a couple miscues, steered their way to a 42 – 32 win at home. The Maniacs made it look easy, as they first scored on a 19 yard pass to Ryan Schlieper and then, on their second possession, chewed up 50 yards in three running plays to score on a one yard run by Tanner Schwartz. To read the rest of this article, pleasee subscribee. If you already subscribe, log in and read page 12A.

  • Idaho State Tax Commissioners visit Orofino Chamber
    Idaho State Tax Commissioners paid a visit to the chamber of commerce luncheon Oct. 3. Tom Katsilometes, Ken Roberts, and Richard Jackson answered questions and gave an update on collecting state revenue. The focus of their presentation was on what’s called the Streamlined Sales and Use Tax. They pointed out a line on one’s state tax return where taxpayers are required to report taxes on items they purchase and use that are from out of state. This includes items purchased via the internet and from other countries.  The use tax is supposed to level the playing field so that local “brick-and-mortar” stores and remote sellers operate under the same rules, ensuring all revenue that is due the state is collected. Purchasers are responsible for paying the tax, interest, and penalties for claiming incorrect exemptions. One example given was that of a business purchasing software by downloading it from the internet. No sales tax is charged on such a transaction; however, the purchase needs to be reported when tax time rolls around. Bottom line: if something is brought into the state and stored or used here, and one has not already been charged sales tax for it, you owe use tax.
    To read the rest of this article, pleasee subscribee. If you already subscribe, log in and read page 4A.

  • Truck rear-ends pickup on Highway 12
    A Peterbilt truck was unable to stop in time when a pickup slowed to make a left-hand turn, rear-ending the pickup in an accident that blocked Highway 12 for two and a half hours, according to a press release from the Idaho State Police (ISP). The accident occurred Oct. 3 at 4:15 p.m., at milepost 32.5 (near Peck). Jolee Zephier, 48, of Lewiston was westbound on Highway 12 in a red Ford F-150. In the vehicle with Zephier was Arthur Broncheau, 66, of Kooskia. To read the rest of this article, pleaseTo read the rest of this article, please subscribe. If you already subscribe, log in and read page 7B.

  • Flu shot clinics in Orofino, Pierce, Weippe
    On Tuesday, Oct. 16, Clearwater Valley Hospital and Clinics will host a Flu Shot Day at the Orofino Clinic from 9 a.m. to 12 noon and 1 to 4:30 p.m. Medicare and Medicaid will be billed, so please bring your Medicare or Medicaid card with you. If you are not a Medicare or Medicaid patient their will be a fee charged, to be paid at the time of the injection. To read the rest of this article, please subscribe. If you already subscribe, log in and read page 7B.

  • Letter to the Editor: Larry Baxter
    Because Carole Galloway is the conservative minority on the Board of County Commissioners, she can anticipate labels such as “uncooperative” and one who “creates unnecessary controversy.” These allegations do not intimidate Carole; she continues to personally represent our communities. The county is enjoying a substantial cost savings because Carole advocated and obtained a closer destination for our garbage. Rather than the long costly haul to Missoula, today our garbage goes to Asotin County. Citizens in Greer and Ahsahka personally contacted her about traffic issues in their towns. She took the initiative, worked with Idaho Dept. of Transportation and got speed limit signs installed in Greer. For Ahsahka residents, she held a community potluck/street dance to raise funds for a solar powered speed sign.  To read the rest of this article, please subscribe. If you already subscribe, log in and read page 6B.

  • Letter to the Editor: Jo Moore
    I’ve been a Republican for over forty years, and registered Republican for the closed primary. But since our county is so small, I have never believed that our local politics should be a partisan choice, and have always made my decisions based on the character and philosophy of the candidate, not by party affiliation. For County Commissioner, I will be voting for John Allen, a Democrat. Why? Because he is a great representative of Clearwater County and I trust him. John has proven to me, when he was Commissioner for four years, that he was a reasonable man. He makes decisions that need to be made based on studying the issue and gathering information. He doesn’t have a personal or party agenda to follow to make his decisions. The other thing I noticed about John is that he makes the decisions I would likely make.
    To read the rest of this article, please subscribe. If you already subscribe, log in and read page 6B.

  • Letter to the Editor: Dale Tustison
    I would like to express a debt of gratitude to the voting public in Clearwater County. I want to begin by saying we all are tired of high taxes, especially when we feel we are being taxed unfairly. It is my opinion that many of you felt you were overtaxed or unfairly taxed when you elected Carole Galloway to the County Commission to get some fair representation. Idaho tax law states when you disagree with your tax bill you go to the Board of Equalization. ie; The BOE. (County Commissioners). If that does not work you go to the Idaho State Board of Tax Appeals. To read the rest of this article, please subscribe. If you already subscribe, log in and read page 4B.

  • OCS counts down to rental deadline
    Nov. 1 is the Orofino Clean and Sober (OCS) Drop-In Center’s final deadline date for our rent to be paid in full or we will need to move out of our location at 235 Johnson Ave., Orofino. It has been amazing and encouraging to see how much interest and support there actually is for the Drop-In’s cause of providing an alcohol and drug free environment for fun and learning in Orofino, for Orofino and the surrounding areas. All of our local and nearby churches took up a collection and presented us with a significant donation. Two businesses in our area, Orofino Physical Therapy & Wellness, John Garrison, and Ray Timber Harvesting, Tom and Wendy Ray, have each pledged to donate a substantial monthly amount to be used toward our rent. To read the rest of this article, please subscribe. If you already subscribe, log in and read page 2B.

  • Government regulations topic of meeting
    The meeting held Oct. 1, at the Weippe Library exposed, on a personal level, the abuse of the ever changing rules and regulations imposed by government agencies on local people and businesses costing tens of thousands of dollars for some and millions for others. Dan Vaughn, who owns a mine in Clearwater County, was told by a Forest Service official, “We make our own rules, we don’t have to go by Federal Code or Regulations.” Another man who owns a small farm commented on the ever changing rules of the USDA making it impossible to stay in compliance, costing him thousands of dollars. To read the rest of this article, please subscribe. If you already subscribe, log in and read page 9A.

  • Motorists should expect short traffic delays near Aquarius Campground
    Effective Oct. 9, temporary traffic delays may occur on Road 247, Beaver Creek Road, approximately one-half mile to three miles northwest of Aquarius Campground. The delays are necessary to safeguard travelers while stabilization work takes place on roads located uphill from Road 247. Efforts will be made to minimize the frequency and length of the delays. To read the rest of this article, please subscribe. If you already subscribe, log in and read page 12A.

  • Fraser news
    Wanda Strong is planning a baby shower for her niece, Jessica Gangewer, on Oct. 20, to be held at the Fraser Comm. Center at 2 p.m. Jessica and Taylor Spencer are expecting a baby girl on Jan. 28. The air finally cleared up enough that the farmers were able to get clearance to burn the stubble on the wheat fields this past week. The Brown Family Farm worked up a number of the fields here in Fraser, and they have worked long hours seeding the winter wheat. It’s still very dry, but the fall work has to be gotten done. Such is the fate of all farmers; it’s called FAITH; the rains may be late, but they will come. Katie Bird reported that her parents Margo and Evan Anderson are residents of the Fraser community. Evan is helping Mike with the farming activities and Margo is busy with her own business. To read the rest of this article, please subscribe. If you already subscribe, log in and read page 4A.

  • Pierce news
    The Motocross Race at Bald Mountain has been postponed due to fire danger; however the drawing will take place Saturday Oct. 13, so if you haven’t gotten your tickets to win a Nightforce scope, $300 at S&S Foods, a night escape along the Lochsa River at Syringa, a beautiful handmade quilt or a case of oil contact Chris 827-0845, 435-4782 or Carmen 464-1088 and we’ll help you out. Great news for snow riders: with help from AVISTA and electrician Nolan Cochrell we have the T-Bar running.  To read the rest of this article, please subscribe. If you already subscribe, log in and read page 4B.

  • Happenings on the Hilltop
    If you are interested in becoming an Emergency Medical Technician (EMT), an orientation meeting will be held Thursday, Nov. 1 at Timberline library at 7 p.m. Those interested in becoming an EMT must be able to pass a background check, have a driver’s license and vehicle, and have an interest in serving their community. For more information call Nick Rhoads at 435-4288. Flu vaccine will be available at the Weippe Senior Meal Site - Thursday, Oct. 18, noon to 1:30. Medicare eligible people only. Medicare covers the entire cost. Pierce Medical Clinic is also open for flu vaccine Thursday, Oct. 18 from 8:30 to 11:30. This option is open to everyone. To read the rest of this article, please subscribe. If you already subscribe, log in and read page 2B.

  • Sportsmen's Report for October 11
    The waterfowl season opens Saturday, Oct. 13, in Area 2, and runs through Jan. 25. Area 2 includes all of the state not included in Area 1, which opened Oct. 6. Area 1 includes all of the Fort Hall Indian Reservation, including private inholdings; Bannock County; Bingham County, except that portion within the Blackfoot Reservoir drainage; Caribou County within the Fort Hall Indian Reservation; and Power County east of State Hwy. 37 and State Hwy. 39.

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