CLEARWATER TRIBUNE HOME

August 2, 2012

Clearwater Region fishing report

   Kokanee fishing on Dworshak reservoir has been fantastic recently. Some anglers are claiming the fishing is as good as they have ever seen it, with some reporting catching their daily limit of 25 fat, healthy fish in the 12-13 inch range. 

   The best fishing seems to be in the Grandad area and upstream towards the upper reaches of the reservoir. Anglers fishing downstream, between Grandad are Dent Bridge, are also catching fish, but fishing seems to be better farther up the reservoir. 

   Anglers are reporting catching kokanee in two size ranges: 8 to 9-inch fish and 12 to 13-inch fish. As summer turns to fall, the larger fish will make their way out of the reservoir into the rivers and creeks to spawn.

   When spawning, Kokanee become very tight lipped and do not take to a hook. However, the smaller fish will likely be 10 inches by September and will provide great fishing throughout the fall in the reservoir.

   Boat anglers trolling standard flash gear in front of a corn or maggot baited wedding ring seems to be the ticket. Most fish caught are running shallow, in the 12 to 20 feet range.

   So hook up your boat or find a fishing buddy with a boat and head to Dworshak. It is a big lake and finding fish can be difficult for beginners, but don’t be afraid to go to where you see other anglers. Just remember to give them plenty of space and always use good angler etiquette.

   Bass anglers are also reporting catching plenty of smallmouth using rubber jigs, crankbait and spinnerbaits along the rocky shoreline. Dworshak holds the Idaho state record for the largest smallmouth bass, a huge 9 lbs-11.5 oz. fish caught by Dan Steigers in 2006. The reservoir has been listed in the top 100 Lakes for smallmouth fishing by a national magazine.

   If you’re looking for big bass – fish deep. You may not catch as many as you will around the shore, but the ones you do will be huge. Get your lure down to 20 to 40 feet, even 60 feet deep-and preferably right on bottom. Use a fast-sinking ¼ to ½ oz. lead jig dressed in bucktail, rubber, marabou, or nylon. Light lines of about 6 to 8 pound test lets your lure sink quickly, moves naturally, and keeps you in contact with your jig creeping along in bottom.

   The above information is compiled from regional Fish and Game fishery managers, local tackle shops and anglers and was updated July 31.