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Updated April 18 at 12:15 p.m.


Updated April 18 at 12:15 p.m.

April 17, 2014 Front Page
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April 10 Poll Results
Cursive in Schools
Do you feel that schools should teach children cursive handwriting?

82% Yes. (49)
17% No. (10)
  2% Undecided. (1)

This is not a scientific poll.

Story Headlines for April 17, 2014
(Not all articles are listed. Read front page news by clicking on the link in the lower left column.)
These are NOT the paid access links. Click on the link near the top of the page to view the entire newspaper.
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  • Clearwater County to receive $1.1 million from SRS funds
    Any day now Clearwater County waits to receive $1.1 million from the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act (SRS), (originally the Craig-Wyden Bill) of the $28 million distributed to Idaho. The funds of SRS are generated by the U.S. Forest Service, are intended to help communities such as ours in several ways; one is to improve the environment within our forested Federal Lands and assist counties in maintaining the forests and develop wildfire protection plans. Another goal is to help provide jobs to those who live in areas where no taxes are generated due to being Federal Lands. Local resource advisory committees (RAC) are formed to recommend how the money is spent and to oversee the projects needed within their region. For Clearwater County, much of the money will be spent to help maintain county roads, a major priority and ongoing expense to the county, which property taxes just can’t realistically accommodate. To read the rest of this article, please subscribe. If you already subscribe, log in and read page 4B.

  • City Council attendance seems to grow with each meeting
    A regular council meeting was held by Orofino City Council on April 8, in which attendance was anything but “regular.” Gathering by the familiar faces seen at recent city council and planning and zoning meetings, one could say that the protest against annexation was still very much alive. Close to 50 residents attended the meeting and after additional seating had been filled, members of the audience were asked to be seated or stand in the chamber’s adjoining rooms, to remain in accordance with the building’s fire code. The doors at each exit were left open to offer extra ventilation, Deniece Osterberg asked about Resolution 14-450 and whether or not it had been tabled. The council explained that it had been tabled at the last meeting. It was also explained that it had just been taken off the table and passed that evening. Mrs. Osterberg inquired if there had been any feasibility studies completed on the Land Use Map by an educated person. City staff answered that they were all educated. Clerk Montambo explained that there had been several meetings discussing the issue and that Jerome Mapp was the Official from Boise to help draw up the Future Land Use Map. Osterberg also stated that she was unable to hear throughout the meeting. “I’m sitting up front and I had no clue of what was going on.” “It’s not right,” she said. To read the rest of this article, please subscribe. If you already subscribe, log in and read page 1B.

  • Nezperce Historical Society visits local museums
    Members of the Nezperce Historical Society visited the Weippe Heritage Museum, Weippe Discovery Center and Clearwater Historical Museum in Orofino Saturday. The Society was organized in 2009 with the motto “Bringing the Past to Life.” They have 15 members and meet at the old Masonic Hall in Nezperce, the fourth Monday at noon. There are many displays in the two-story Masonic Hall.
    To read the rest of this article, please subscribe. If you already subscribe, log in and read page 3B.

  • Resurfacing of Gilbert Grade continues through mid-May
    The resurfacing of a section of Idaho 7 near Orofino began Monday and will continue through the middle of May, the Idaho Transportation Department announced. The Gilbert Grade section of the highway will be worked on from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday. Idaho 7 will be reduced to one lane of travel at several locations between milepost 36.78 and milepost 48.8. Drivers should expect delays of up to 15 minutes in the 12-mile corridor. Flaggers will guide vehicles through the construction area. The 1860 Days committee met Thursday and unanimously, with much excitement, chose Myrna Ely as the 2014 Grand Marshal. This very involved Pierce volunteer is to be honored at the 1860 Days parade, Aug. 2. Congratulations, Myrna! The 1860 Days Bake Sale was a huge success, thanks to our very giving community. So many amazing bakers donated their very best, and so many wonderful townspeople and visitors alike bought these baked goods. All of this to make 1860 Days so much more fun this year. There is one more opportunity to enjoy the town's best baking; Saturday, June 7, from 9 a.m. until we sell out again. Keep that date! It is also the date for the ATV Fun Run, so don't miss either one. Our next meeting will be Thursday, April 24, at 6 p.m., at Pierce Community Center. Everyone is always welcome. To read the rest of this article, please subscribe. If you already subscribe, log in and read page 6B.

  • Orofino sits Moscow down
    During the double header on Saturday, April 12, the Orofino Maniacs shut down the Moscow Bears 8-3 and 4-2, making Orofino’s record 8-1 overall on the season so far. Orofino brought a very entertaining game for the crowd showing off some dynamite defense behind Scotty Lee who was battling control problems most of the game, but kept Moscow off balance. Lee gave up five hits while striking out eight. Lee also gave up five walks but those were taken care of by the defense behind him. Orofino turned two fantastic double plays in the first game. To read the rest of this article, please subscribe. If you already subscribe, log in and read page 8A.

  • Friends of Deyo Reservoir week campground host
    The Deyo Reservoir Recreation Site is looking for good natured people to serve as campground hosts for the 2014 season. The most important job of a campground host is to provide an enjoyable camping experience for the public. Hosts are expected to assist visitors with information about the campground and local recreation opportunities. They must work well with people, be personable and neat in appearance and physically able to perform tasks such as clean and stock restrooms, pick up litter, perform fee compliance and post daily reservation signs. The season length is Memorial Day through Labor Day, but could vary depending on usage. Contact Marge Kuchynka at 208-435-4362 or Terri Summerfield at 208-435-4406, or pick up an application at Weippe Discovery Center.
    To read the rest of this article, please subscribe. If you already subscribe, log in and read page 4A.

  • HealthBuilders Foot Reflexology
    HealthBuilders Foot Reflexology is a new business in Orofino, created by Lou Bradford, with the goal of delivering services to help build better health. Lou has been studying extensively and practicing foot reflexology for over 25 years. Reflexology is the field of study that works with the principle that there are reflex areas in the feet (and hands) which correspond to all the glands, organs, and parts of the body. The feet and hands are like a mirror of the human body that provides a “map” to all areas. By gently stimulating these reflexes properly and on a regular basis, the treatments can, in a natural way, help current problems that exist, as well as serve as preventive maintenance to help avoid potential health issues. The benefits of a reflexology treatment include, but are not limited to: improving sleep, relief of stress and tension, improved circulation, reduction of discomfort, and promoting energy and balance.
    To read the rest of this article, please subscribe. If you already subscribe, log in and read page 10A.

  • "Do what you love" in progress at WebInk Design
    It’s funny how some things just seem to fall into place for all the right reasons, and upon walking into one of Orofino’s newest establishments, WebInk Design, I noticed a big sign which read “Do What You Love.” Within a short spell, I realized how appropriate the quote was for the new owner, Stephanie Deyo. She is passionate about what she does and it shows. Her enthusiasm is apparent in her work and her personality and is really quite contagious. The timing for her new endeavor was just right. The perfect location had just become available. The clientele was there. Valley Graphics had closed, as Bill Bosse pursued his mission in Africa. Without commuting to Lewiston, the community found themselves without a printer or the availability of more sophisticated services when it comes to marketing, advertising, and communication. And now, all that and more can be accomplished right here in town and available at WebInk Design.
    To read the rest of this article, please subscribe. If you already subscribe, log in and read page 3A.

  • Letter to the Editor: Shauna Britt
    This primary season several candidates will vie for Idaho’s constitutional offices. Among them is the all important position of State Attorney General (AG). The attorney general provides legal counsel to the state’s other agencies including the governor and legislature. The power of the attorney general’s office should not be underestimated. Whenever an issue arises in the legislature that may eventually be litigated, the legislature will consult the AG. This is usually the case whenever questions arise as to the constitutionality of a particular state or federal law. Many legislators timidly rely on the opinion of the AG as if it were Gospel. One of the major issues facing all Americans is the federal government’s relentless pursuit of gun control. The simplest interpretation of the 2nd Amendment along with corroboration of other documents contemporary with the Constitution would reveal the founder's intent that every individual American be armed and ready to defend liberty. To read the rest of this article, please subscribe. If you already subscribe, log in and read page 11A.

  • The Relay for Life is back
    Last year inmates from the Idaho Correctional Institution in Orofino ran an American Cancer Society Relay for Life within the prison walls; raising $300 mostly from inmates for the American Cancer Society. This year they are planning another event, bringing inmates and prison staff together again for this worthwhile event. The theme this year is “The Aloha” Relay for Life. Running in conjunction with the prison event, on Thursday, April 24, the public is invited to the Aloha Relay for Life 2014 Kick-Off being held at the Kamiah Elementary School Multi-Purpose Room. From 5 to 6 p.m. there is an open house with a dinner buffet “luau” to follow. The feast will be prepared by Ted Weeks and crew.
    To read the rest of this article, please subscribe. If you already subscribe, log in and read page 3A.

  • From this Chair
    The hummingbirds have arrived! But, not at the McNall or Stanton residences. Bessie Enyeart, who lives at Hidden Village on Riverside, was the first reader to call and say she had a hummingbird visitor at her home last Thursday, just in time for lunch at noon. Bessie believes that the same hummingbirds return each year, because they go straight for the feeder, as if they remember where it is placed. She said that when she lived in Grangemont she would get 30 to 40 hummingbirds at a time, and though she still gets quite a few where she lives, it’s not as many as when she lived there. Bessie also thinks the reduced numbers may be due to the fact that so many people feed hummingbirds these days, giving them a wide variety of feeders to choose from.
    To read the rest of this article, please subscribe. If you already subscribe, log in and read page 3A.

  • School Board meets April 21 at Youth ChalleNGe Academy
    The Joint School District 171 School Board will meet Monday, April 21 at the Idaho Youth ChalleNGe Academy in Pierce. A tour of the facility will be held at 6:30 p.m., followed by the meeting at 7 p.m. The academy’s cadets will provide a color guard for the flag salute. Agenda items that will be discussed include a surplus of a desktop printer and wall mount folding lunch tables at Orofino Elementary. Resignations to be considered at this meeting include: Bethany Colaprete; Dorie Stacy (THS Student Council); and Chynna Freshour, PSR.
    To read the rest of this article, please subscribe. If you already subscribe, log in and read page 11B.

  • Bridge resurfacing projects start soon in north central Idaho
    Drivers are advised to anticipate delays on three north central Idaho highways after work starts to resurface bridges, the Idaho Transportation Department announced. Bridge decks on U.S. 95, Idaho 162 and U.S. 12 will be resurfaced starting April 21. On U.S. 95, work on the bridge at the Skookumchuck Recreation Site will start April 22. The bridge is at Milepost 219. On Idaho 162, work will start on April 22 on the Lawyer’s Canyon Creek Bridge. The bridge is at Milepost 5.6. On U.S. 12, work will start on April 21 on the Catholic Creek Bridge. The bridge is at Milepost 13.9. Drivers should expect delays of up to 15 minutes. There will be a single lane of travel on the bridges.
    To read the rest of this article, please subscribe. If you already subscribe, log in and read page 10A.

  • March precipitation helps water supply rebound
    Back–to-back months of above average precipitation across most of Idaho boosted the water supply outlook according to the April report released by the Idaho Natural Resources Conservation Service. March precipitation amounts ranged from 103% to 190% of normal. “The water year started with four dry months from October to January,” said Ron Abramovich, Water Supply Specialist with the Idaho Natural Resources Conservation Service. “The water supply made an amazing recovery due to the February and March precipitation.” “However, despite good precipitation the last two months we are predicting water shortages in several areas,” said Abramovich. Predicted water supply shortages will occur in the Big Wood, Big Lost, Little Lost, Oakley, Owyhee, and Salmon Falls basins. To read the rest of this article, please subscribe. If you already subscribe, log in and read page 4B.

  • Fraser news
    Dolores Watson reported that the Rebekah Assembly President, Barbara Pettigrew and Jean Reinke traveled from Melba, to visit the White Pine Rebekah Lodge in Weippe. Dolores hosted the two ladies at her home. Before continuing on to Orofino the next morning, seven members treated Barbara and Jean to breakfast at the Timberline Café. The Fraser Community Center Board held their monthly meeting at 12 noon on Wednesday, April 9. Present were Donna Brown, Marie Armitage, Oreta Stuart and Norma Brand. The decision was made to cancel the Mother’s Day Prime Rib Dinner for this year. Projects under consideration are a new, smaller wood shed attached to the building and a different outdoor toilet. The old table that served as an island in the kitchen was returned to the Gangewer family. The date for the Budget Meeting was set for Wednesday, May 14. Sharon McHone reported the Midnight Sun Welsh Pony farm is still waiting for the new babies to be born. Her mother-in-law, the late Ruth McHone, always said “The mares are waiting for the full moon to give birth.” That full moon will be on April 15, which is supposed to be the same time as the lunar eclipse. We will let you know next week if this was the big day. To read the rest of this article, please subscribe. If you already subscribe, log in and read page 12B.

  • Happenings on the Hilltop
    Although I am sad that Easter does not fall during Spring Break this year, I look forward to the excitement that the day always brings! Children love the day for the obvious reasons; to get all dressed up, to color and search for eggs, and to get loads of candy. I, as a Christian, look forward to the day to reflect on my Savior and the sacrifice that He made for all of us. I hope that it will be a beautiful day and that you all enjoy your time with family and friends! On Easter Sunday, April 20, the Weippe Wesleyan Church is hosting an Easter Egg Hunt at 1 p.m. There will be more than 800 stuffed plastic eggs for the kids to collect! All kids age 1 year through school age are invited to come out and take part in this free activity. The Weippe Wesleyan Church would also like to extend an invitation to coffee, tea, and pastries at 10 a.m. and their Easter Service on Sunday at 10:45 a.m. There will be special music and a message for all.
    To read the rest of this article, please subscribe. If you already subscribe, log in and read page 3B.

  • Pierce news
    The 1860 Days committee met Thursday and unanimously, with much excitement, chose Myrna Ely as the 2014 Grand Marshal. This very involved Pierce volunteer is to be honored at the 1860 Days parade, Aug. 2. Congratulations, Myrna! The 1860 Days Bake Sale was a huge success, thanks to our very giving community. So many amazing bakers donated their very best, and so many wonderful townspeople and visitors alike bought these baked goods. All of this to make 1860 Days so much more fun this year. There is one more opportunity to enjoy the town's best baking; Saturday, June 7, from 9 a.m. until we sell out again. Keep that date! It is also the date for the ATV Fun Run, so don't miss either one. Our next meeting will be Thursday, April 24, at 6 p.m., at Pierce Community Center. Everyone is always welcome.
    To read the rest of this article, please subscribe. If you already subscribe, log in and read page 12B.

  • Sportsmen's Report for April 17
    Idaho born Spring Chinook salmon are starting to show up in the Columbia River, the gateway to their spawning grounds in the Gem State. As of Sunday, April 13, 4,603 Spring Chinook salmon have been counted going past Bonneville Dam, the first place they are counted on their 700-plus mile journey to the Salmon and Clearwater River drainages. While predicting returning numbers of salmon is a very tricky business, early season forecasts indicate the number of spring Chinook returning this year will be much higher than in 2013.

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